Don't be a Tupperware Leader

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One of my favorite books on leadership is EntreLeadership by Dave Ramsey, probably because I lean toward the entrepreneurial side of the continuum. The lesson that has stuck with me in the years since reading the book was that as a leader, I am the ceiling. To give fair credit, Ramsey takes this concept from John Maxwell's The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. Maxwell calls it the "Law of the Lid", as in the lid on your organization.

As leaders, we are both our organization's solutions and our organization's problems. Hopefully with more tally marks on the solutions side. Our strengths become our organization's strengths. Our weaknesses = the organization's weaknesses.

This is a fact of life. None of us are perfect.

That being said, if we fail to take a good, hard look in the mirror every so often to become increasingly aware of our weaknesses and act to mitigate them, our organization will run up against that lid sooner rather than later.

This is critical whether you are a project leader, department manager, or the CEO. So, how do we mitigate our tendency to micromanage, our inability to lead an effective meeting, or any other personal shortcoming?

  1. At the very least, acknowledge the deficit. Don't pretend it doesn't exist.
  2. Build your team purposefully to fill in your gaps. Don't clone yourself or you will simply magnify your own flaws.
  3. Focus on applying your strengths first, then work to improve your weaknesses where appropriate.

Opposites attract in marriage for a reason. I am great with managing the little details. My spouse is great at keeping perspective. This naturally creates conflict, but it also creates balance.

This is how a fine tuned leadership team works. Diverse strengths lift the lid a little higher, allowing the organization to reach greater heights.

This is also why filling in the gaps with natural talent is #2 on the list. It's faster, more efficient, and more reliable to bring established assets to the table than to try to course-correct your shortcomings.

You may never be the best meeting facilitator, but you should observe your empowered replacement to continuously grow and adapt because you also never know when the recruited talent could call in sick or walk away.

Bottom Line: Don't be vacuum-packed tupperware. With awareness, purposeful team development, and personal development, you should continuously push the lid for your organization.

How have you mitigated your leadership weaknesses?