Funders Who Reward Capacity Development

Nonprofit-Capacity-Building-Quote.jpg
Creative and sustainable nonprofits are drawing more and more funding from "investors" while the pool of feel-good "donors" is shrinking.

You can trace much of how nonprofits operate back to the source of their funding.

The majority of nonprofits have a Development Director whose key role is not development of the organization, but development of funds for the organization. They are in charge of writing grants, reporting on grants, courting foundation contacts and major donors, managing fundraising campaigns, and basically asking for money.

In my experience, very few nonprofits see "development" beyond the role of asking for money, over and over and over again.

If we trace this back, it's easy to see the reason for this reliance on repetitive fundraising.

Historically, many foundations and donors demanded that the greatest possible percentage of their funds be invested in direct program services. In other words, donors have demanded that nonprofits spend donated funds right away, with no investment in the future.

This idea was set in stone by organizations like the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance, Guidestar and Charity Navigator; sites whose profit model was based on giving donors solid information about the nonprofits they were considering donating to, but whose lack of concern or awareness of genuine indicators of mission efficacy resulted in a long era of comparing nonprofits based on one major indicator: their "overhead".

In fact, many states (including Utah) still publish the percentage of donations invested in direct program services on charitable solicitations permits - requiring these permits to be displayed on location and making such information available online, as if it were a genuine indicator of impact that was comparable across mission focuses.

This hyper-focus on a particularly meaningless percentage has resulted in enormous pressure to pay as little as possible for everything, from space to supplies to talent. Nonprofits are expected to get everything donated and to attract bleeding hearts who will work hard in crumbling offices on the bad side of town for less money and terrible health insurance.

I was talking with several talented employees of a local nonprofit that I admire a great deal for their forward-thinking revenue models last week. I was amazed to learn that because of their location, they are approached daily by drug dealers and have to watch their young clients deal with the same interactions as they come and go from classes.

A for-profit arts school would absolutely never subject their clients to this type of environment; it's bad for business. This organization is catering to the same clientele with unique and important STEM education, yet they have not made it a priority to move to a better location. Why? Almost certainly because it would increase their overhead.

While many nonprofits are responding to opportunities for sustainability and internal revenue creation, they continue to sacrifice in ways that ultimately lead to poor performance of those initiatives, or outright failure.

However, the nonprofit culture is shifting, albeit slowly.

Family foundations are now being run by a younger generation, a generation characterized by entrepreneurship and impact. More and more corporations are investing in nonprofit grants and awards that reward sustainability and innovation. And thanks to technology, we are witnessing nonprofit and for-profit startups that are making a splashy impact, while giving 100+ year old nonprofit in the same niche a run for their money.

With this shift, those big three online nonprofit rating services finally backed away from this percentage as an indicator of mission performance with an open letter in 2013 and a follow-up letter to nonprofits in 2014.

The days of doling out $10,000 checks for feel-good programs are petering out and it's a good thing.

While I've witnessed many nonprofits deny this shift and struggle to incorporate better business models into their long-term mission strategy, the process is leading to stronger, more accountable, and increasingly sustainable cause organizations who may very well multiply their impact on homelessness, domestic violence, animal cruelty, addiction, and every other mission focus.

And much of this credit comes back to funders and donors who are willing to invest in the long game, who are looking beyond the percentage of donations invested in one-time services and reinforcing the importance of internal capacity.

Eide Bailly's Resourcefullness Award is just one example of a funder that sees the bigger picture, investing a total of $15,000 in nonprofits with creative and sustainable revenue generation initiatives in Utah, Arizona, Colorado and Minnesota (applications are due August 12th).

Here in Utah, our Community Foundation just held it's third Social Investors Forum, curating a community-wide dialogue around the importance of funding unique, innovative, and sustainable nonprofit initiatives while bringing new funders to the table who are more comfortable with "investing" rather than "donating".

Our state Arts & Museums Division invests up to $2,500 in arts organizations each year specifically to aid them in developing their capacity.

These focus changes are critical to creating long-term impact. In effect, these are genuine investments that multiply the impact of the funders. They trigger and support internal capacity development and revenue generation programs that allow the nonprofit to further its reach and its mission, year after year.

That's a donation check I want to write.

So, whether your making a personal donation, a grant award, or a creating a corporate giving program, consider reaching out to nonprofits within your mission focus area and finding out which ones are making this leap.

Invest in the long game, not low overhead, which is too often an indicator of low growth, unsatisfied employees, high turnover, and ultimately, low impact.

And for you nonprofits, invest in talented, creative minds that can challenge your status quo, and brag about how you are positioning to make a difference for now, and for the future.