Give a man a fish...and you've got a problem

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The problem? He's coming back for another fish tomorrow, and the next day, and the day after that. Too many organizations fail to empower men (and women) to fish on their own. There exists a powerful opportunity to improve the long-term outlook for every client we reach, whether we operate a nonprofit or a for-profit. And consumers recognize the difference.

What is the long-term impact of your work? For the individual? For the community? 

Case in point: The U.S. Healthcare System

Within the traditional disease-oriented "healthcare" system:

My child has a rash that is concerning. I call the local pediatric clinic after searching online for which one is in my plan. I make the earliest possible appointment for tomorrow afternoon. It's the only appointment available, but I will be at work, so I ask my husband to handle it. They drive 15 minutes to the clinic, fill out four forms, and wait 15 minutes for the physician. The nurse rooms my daughter and they wait for another 10 minutes. The physician looks at the rash for 5 minutes, recommends an over-the-counter cream, and then bills the insurance for $180. After contractual adjustment, we pay $153 a week later. The rash has still not cleared and my daughter came down with a bad cold several days after the visit...my own throat is a little scratchy.

Consumers, within the healthcare sector and beyond, are beginning to demand a different experience.

They recognize when they are authoritatively told what to do and when they are educated, cared for, and empowered. The latter is a much more satisfying experience.

In what ways are you only giving out fish? Your customers may be demanding a fish. They may genuinely appreciate the fish. But, how you could add in the resources, tools, and approach to truly empower them to fish?

This is especially imperative within mission-driven organizations.

I can hand out a box of food at the local pantry to an impoverished single mother of four and feel really good about it. But, what will that mother do when the food in the box runs out in a few days? Will she have a job, transportation, child care, a living wage, a safe home, and the ability to buy or grow her own food?

The next step could be as simple as a job skill training once a month in the pantry warehouse or posting the job ads and relevant wrap-around services on a bulletin board where clients wait in line to pick up their box.

For-profits get caught in the fish giveaway trap as well.

As a consultant, I may undermine demand for my own services by offering do-it-yourself resources and tools, but the truth is: If you serve your customers well and empower them to do more, you will always be in demand. Meanwhile you will empower yourself to do more by removing dependence on a limited asset...you.

I hire a CPA for my taxes to avoid learning all the ins and outs of various IRS schedules, but I demand that my accountant educate me on how to manage my personal finances better. I've referred nearly a dozen friends and family members to my current CPA because he exudes this rare quality.

The organizations who will rise and stay at the top aren't creating dependency. They are creating empowered evangelists who sing their praises, and become donors or referral sources.

Are your teaching your clients to reel in their own tuna?